A selection of the latest articles from Molesey Matters.

Molesey Lock

Our lock was first proposed in 1802 because of the shallows upstream but nothing came of the suggestion. During droughts, the Thames was liable to become too shallow for river craft to pass through. The heavily laden barges were held up, sometimes for weeks at a time while the bargemen waited for the weather to turn.

Where there is muck there’s is money

In the 1790s, the Board of Agriculture commissioned two qualified surveyors, Thomas Baird (1793) and John Middleton (1797) to report on the state of agriculture in Middlesex.

The Value of Dredging/Treasures of the Thames

The title is a bit cheeky. This is not a piece about flooding (we will follow up on this aspect of dredging at a later stage.). But it is indeed about the value and benefit of dredging it.

Memories of Molesey School Days

They say our school days are the happiest days of our lives. For most of us, it’s not as simple as that. We remember the headteacher we feared and the teacher we adored, the lifelong friends we made and the bullies we despised, the subjects we loved and those we hated…

Platts Eyot and Thornycroft

The name of the island is derived from Platt of Molesey who used it for growing withers. Until the 1880s osiers were grown on the eyot, a species of willow used for basket-making but it was also used for dumping spoil from excavation of the Stain Hill Reservoirs, creating the large hill on the island’s western end.

A Seal in Molesey

Seal numbers in the Greater Thames Estuary have increased almost back to their natural rates thanks to a conservation project, after being hunted for fur and meat.

Avoid Tragedy on the Water

I am sure you will join me as our thoughts go out to the family of a young man who tragically lost his life. A teenage boy drowned in the Thames on the hottest day of the year Wednesday June 21st.

Shepperton’s Hedgehog Sanctuary

Hedgehogs are in decline. Even over the past 10 years or so we have seen notably fewer on the roads or in our gardens. So many people I have spoken to about this wonderful charity have never heard of it. We want to change that!

Molesey FC

Ex-Corinthian, and prominent local G.P, Dr. James Jenkinson Knox started the ‘Hampton Court and East Molesey Association Football Club’ in the Autumn of 1892 (the year the song ‘Daisy Daisy’ came out).

Our Local shops – Use them or Lose them!

In the first six months of 2016 more than 2,500 high street shops closed and some recent analysis suggests that nearly one in four non-food purchases in the UK are done online from a standing start of none 20 years ago.

Handel’s Water Music

Handel’s Water Music is made up of three orchestral suites, and was written 300 years ago for an outdoor performance for King George I on the Thames.

The Mystery of the Molesey Boat ‘Jane Scott’

Two years ago Jane Scott Ellingham’s cousin Judith was exploring the local area having recently moved to Hampton. She discovered the Walled Garden in Sunbury and went in for a look at the Gallery.

If you missed an issue of Molesey Matters, don't worry you can read them all online. Find out more about each issue or read the online version.

Issue 12

Molesey Lock Where there is muck there’s is money The Value of Dredging/Treasures of the Thames Memories of Molesey School… Read more »

Issue 11

In this month’s issue we learn the history of Platt’s Eyot and Thornycroft. We look back at this year’s Hanworth Classic, and we hear about the seal in Molesey.

Issue 10

Well the sun did come out for Carnival Day! Congratulations to all involved, in both the set up and of course to the community as a whole for joining in. I mentioned in last month’s issue that I might try the Zorb racing! I have to admit that as a man prone to injury I decided to watch instead. Looked great fun though. A list of the float winners is listed on Page 16.

Issue 9

The Molesey Carnival is upon us again on Saturday June 10th! Best wishes from Molesey Matters to all involved. Personally I am really looking forward to having a go at the Zorb racing – just what I need for my bad back! The front cover is obviously Mr Mole, taken last year by Ted Palmer.

Issue 8

Welcome to the May issue! We are now firmly into Spring. I am particularly enjoying this year the blossom appearing in our garden. Pinks, yellows, whites, purples – It really does make you feel like good things are on the way.

Issue 7

In this month’s issue, the Molesey History Society tells us of the Modernist Howard Houses that went up in West Molesey in the 1930’s.

Issue 6

In this month’s issue we learn about Molesey’s Mills , Royal artist Terence Cuneo and take a dip into the history of Medieval Fish Ponds.

Issue 5

In this month’s issue we learn about Molesey’s first cottage hospital and also about Alfred Sisley, who painted beautiful scenes around Molesey. February is the month of David Garrick’s 300th birthday, so we take a look at his life, and of course celebrate Valentine’s Day.

Issue 4

In this issue we look at Christmas in Molesey in the early 1900’s, learn about bare knuckle boxing at Molesey Hurst, the history of postcards and have a local look at the Fire Brigade.

Issue 3

In this month’s issue we discover we used to have a cinema, how Molesey was named and learn that we have a priest hole in the vicinity. We look at how nearby film studios were used during the war, and how Molesey was the place where the first ever golf trick shot was recorded.

Issue 2

In this month’s issue we look at the fabulous Dunkirk Little Ships and the history behind Kent Chemist in Walton Road. We look at a local collection of vintage fire engines and hear the story of suffragette Kitty Marion and the Hurst Park Grandstand. We also talk to Doug Bashford, who worked at Molesey’s previous local magazine, The Review.

Issue 1

Welcome to the first issue of Molesey Matters. This month we celebrate Molesey Boat Clubs 150th anniversary, and applaud the heroics of 3 members all returning from Rio with gold medals. We also look at the history behind one of Moseley’s oldest family businesses, and recommend some close by attractions as part of Open London 2016.