Molesey Lock

Our lock was first proposed in 1802 because of the shallows upstream but nothing came of the suggestion. During droughts, the Thames was liable to become too shallow for river craft to pass through. The heavily laden barges were held up, sometimes for weeks at a time while the bargemen waited for the weather to turn.

Where there is muck there’s is money

In the 1790s, the Board of Agriculture commissioned two qualified surveyors, Thomas Baird (1793) and John Middleton (1797) to report on the state of agriculture in Middlesex.

The Value of Dredging/Treasures of the Thames

The title is a bit cheeky. This is not a piece about flooding (we will follow up on this aspect of dredging at a later stage.). But it is indeed about the value and benefit of dredging it.

Memories of Molesey School Days

They say our school days are the happiest days of our lives. For most of us, it’s not as simple as that. We remember the headteacher we feared and the teacher we adored, the lifelong friends we made and the bullies we despised, the subjects we loved and those we hated…

Platts Eyot and Thornycroft

The name of the island is derived from Platt of Molesey who used it for growing withers. Until the 1880s osiers were grown on the eyot, a species of willow used for basket-making but it was also used for dumping spoil from excavation of the Stain Hill Reservoirs, creating the large hill on the island’s western end.

A Seal in Molesey

Seal numbers in the Greater Thames Estuary have increased almost back to their natural rates thanks to a conservation project, after being hunted for fur and meat.

Avoid Tragedy on the Water

I am sure you will join me as our thoughts go out to the family of a young man who tragically lost his life. A teenage boy drowned in the Thames on the hottest day of the year Wednesday June 21st.

Shepperton’s Hedgehog Sanctuary

Hedgehogs are in decline. Even over the past 10 years or so we have seen notably fewer on the roads or in our gardens. So many people I have spoken to about this wonderful charity have never heard of it. We want to change that!

Molesey FC

Ex-Corinthian, and prominent local G.P, Dr. James Jenkinson Knox started the ‘Hampton Court and East Molesey Association Football Club’ in the Autumn of 1892 (the year the song ‘Daisy Daisy’ came out).

Our Local shops – Use them or Lose them!

In the first six months of 2016 more than 2,500 high street shops closed and some recent analysis suggests that nearly one in four non-food purchases in the UK are done online from a standing start of none 20 years ago.

Handel’s Water Music

Handel’s Water Music is made up of three orchestral suites, and was written 300 years ago for an outdoor performance for King George I on the Thames.

The Mystery of the Molesey Boat ‘Jane Scott’

Two years ago Jane Scott Ellingham’s cousin Judith was exploring the local area having recently moved to Hampton. She discovered the Walled Garden in Sunbury and went in for a look at the Gallery.

Sir Thomas Heneage and Anne Poyntz

Sir Thomas Heneage (b. before 1482, d. 1553) was Cardinal Wolsey’s gentleman usher at Hampton Court, and then courtier to Henry VIII.

Wallis, Freda and The Duke

Most of us living in Molesey will know about our connection with the Duke and his love of racing at Kempton Park. He also had a special reason to be in the surrounding areas. He frequently visited local socialite Freda Dudley Ward.

The Mount Felix Tapestry

Last month I featured an article on ANZAC Day and the Mount Felix Hospital. Since April 2015 a small army of stitchers around Elmbridge have worked in teams, and sometimes on their own, to create 44 panels for the Mount Felix Tapestry.

Molesey Amateur Swimming Club

Molesey Amateur Swimming Club was established about 1909, at a time when river bathing was popular. The club initially seems to have been an all-male organisation.

George VI’s Coronation

George VI’s coronation at Westminster Abbey took place on 12 May 1937, the date previously intended for Edward’s coronation.

Anzac Day ,Mount Felix and Walton on Thames

“ANZAC” was the name given to a combined force of First Australian Imperial Force and New Zealand Army troops who landed on Turkey’s Gallipoli Peninsula at around dawn on Sunday, the 25th day of April, 1915, barely nine months after the outbreak of World War I.

The West Molesey man who gave Conservatives their name

It’s surprising that so few people have heard of John Wilson Croker, secretary to the Admiralty, privy Councillor and MP. For he was the most brilliant Parliamentarian of his day, decimating his opponents with a mastery of facts, accuracy of statement and incisiveness of wit that are all too lacking in the House today.

Medieval Fish Ponds

There are many types of historic pond. Some pond types are far better researched than others. Fish ponds, for example, are often well documented. Marl pits, on the other hand, are incredibly common in some parts of the country, yet little is known about them.

Terence Cuneo

Terence Cuneo (1907–1996) was an English painter famous for his scenes of railways, horses, ceremonies, and military action. He was not only one of the world’s greatest military painters, he was also one of the top railway artists as well.